Category Babies

Dressing baby for bed
Babies

Dressing baby for bed

Dressing baby for bed: the basics Choosing the right clothes Dress your baby in enough warm clothes to keep her warm without blankets. Once she can roll over, she can get out from under the blankets and get cold. If you dress your baby in layers of fitted clothing, you can add or take away layers as the temperature changes.

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Babies

Can you spoil a baby?

Can you spoil a baby? The answer to this question is ' No! ' Babies do need lots of attention, and you might worry - or other people might tell you - that if you 'give in' too often or give too much attention, it will 'spoil' your baby. But this won't happen. You won't create bad habits by responding to your baby's needs.
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Babies

Crying: babies and children 0-8 years

About crying in babies and children All children cry when they're hungry, tired, uncomfortable, sick or in pain. Sometimes they cry because they need affection. Toddlers and older children might also cry because they're frustrated, sad or angry, for example. But it can sometimes be hard to work out what your crying child needs, especially if she isn't talking yet.
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Babies

Separation anxiety in babies and children

What is separation anxiety in children? Separation anxiety is children's common and normal fear of being away from their parents or carers. The behaviour you might see when children are separated from parents is sometimes called separation protest. Separation anxiety can start at around 8 months and reach its peak in babies aged 14-18 months.
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Babies

Fear of strangers: babies and young children

Fear of strangers: the basics Fear of strangers is very common. It's a normal stage in child development. It happens as your baby develops a healthy attachment to familiar people - like you. Because babies prefer familiar adults, they might react to strangers by crying or fussing, going very quiet, looking fearful or hiding.
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Babies

Breath-holding

About breath-holding spells Breath-holding usually happens when babies or children: are crying are frightened or upset have had a minor accident and have gone into shock. Children cry, then catch their breath and 'hold' it without breathing. They don't do it on purpose - even if it looks like they're holding their breath as part of an extreme tantrum.
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Babies

Shyness: babies and children

About shyness and shy children Shy behaviour is normal in babies and children. For example, a baby might cling to her parents, cry in social situations, or physically try to avoid social interaction by hiding her head, moving or turning away, or shutting her eyes. A preschooler might not want to talk when unfamiliar people speak to him.
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Babies

Raising multilingual and bilingual children: resources

Australia wide Australian Government Department of Human Services - Information in your language Visit this page for links to the Department's translated publications about its payments and services. Harmony Week Harmony Week includes 21 March, which is the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.
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Babies

Baby cues and baby body language: a guide

About baby cues and body language Your baby's body language can tell you how he's feeling and what he needs from you. Your baby's body language gives you important cues about whether she's: tired hungry wide awake and ready to play needing a break. Why it's important to respond to baby cues When you notice your baby's body language and respond to it, he feels safe and secure.
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Babies

Overstimulation: babies and children

What is overstimulation? Overstimulation happens when a child is swamped by more experiences, sensations, noise and activity than she can cope with . For example, a newborn baby might get very unsettled after a party where he's been cuddled by lots of grown-ups. A preschooler might have a tantrum after a big event like a birthday party.
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Babies

Raising multilingual and bilingual children: options

About raising multilingual or bilingual children If you and your partner speak languages other than English, you might want your children to grow up learning these languages. Raising multilingual or bilingual children has many benefits. For example, it can improve communication and bonds in your immediate and extended family.
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Babies

7-8 months: baby development

Baby development at 7-8 months: what's happening Around this time your baby starts working out how to learn more about his world . For example, he'll look closely at objects like rings or bells, uncover toys after seeing them hidden, bang blocks together and look for them when he drops them. He'll still put most things into his mouth too.
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Babies

10-11 months: baby development

Baby development at 10-11 months: what's happening Your baby is very interested in conversations. You'll often hear baby's first word around this age. She's still mainly babbling but might try out one or two words she knows the meaning of, especially 'dada' or 'mama'. But if your baby isn't talking yet, don't worry - he'll communicate with you using body language like waving and pointing.
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Babies

Biting, pinching and hair-pulling

Biting, pinching and hair-pulling: why babies and toddlers do it Young children bite, pinch and pull hair to experiment and explore their environment. For babies , biting, pinching and hair-pulling helps them work out cause and effect, usually at around 6-12 months. It's a way of exploring and getting to know their world.
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Babies

Positive attention and your child

What is positive attention? Positive attention is the way you show delight in your child and warmth in your relationship through: smiling at your child making eye contact and using caring facial expressions being physically gentle and caring with your child using words to celebrate and encourage your child showing interest in your child's interests, activities and achievements.
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Babies

5-6 months: baby development

Baby development at 5-6 months: what's happening At 5-6 months, your baby is learning about who she is . She's also working out the difference between parents, caregivers, strangers, adults and children. At this age, she has made important attachments to her parents and other close family members or carers, and likes spending time with them.
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Babies

11-12 months: baby development

Baby development at 11-12 months: what's happening Your baby will soon be 12 months old! It's amazing how much your baby has developed in the last year. Your baby is now communicating in many ways - pointing, grunting, nodding, waving and often trying to talk to you too. Her babbling sounds more like a conversation, and she might say a couple of single words she understands, like 'dada' and 'mama'.
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Babies

What's in a smile?

Why smiling is good for your child Most of us can't help smiling at our babies every chance we get. The urge to make them smile back can keep us busy for hours. Smiling at your baby is important because it: plays a part in bonding and attachment helps your baby feel secure and safe helps your baby develop and learn about the world.
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Babies

Understanding baby behaviour and awareness

How baby behaviour and awareness are related Your baby's early experiences and relationships stimulate her brain, shaping the way she sees and responds to the world. As your baby's awareness of the world expands through these experiences, she develops and learns, and you'll see lots of changes in her behaviour.
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Babies

Fear of the bath: babies and toddlers

Why children are afraid of the bath Newborns might feel out of control, not like the change of temperature or not like the way floating feels. Older babies and toddlers might be afraid of the noise of the water draining or of slipping under the water. They might not like having their hair washed or getting water or soap in their eyes.
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Babies

Baby communication and talking: what to expect

Crying: baby's first communication From the moment they're born, babies have a very effective way of telling you what they're thinking and feeling. It's called crying. Crying is how babies let you know they want or need something - more cuddles please, no more cuddles please, hungry, not hungry enough, too tired, not tired enough, feeling too cold, feeling too warm.
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